Jabra Evolve 75e Wireless Earbuds for a Solution in a Professional Environment

Jabra has been kind enough to send us several products to review recently. Back in November, we reviewed a pair of Jabra Elite 25e wireless earbuds, and today we get a chance to review a similar looking pair with a different purpose.


These wireless earbuds are the Jabra Evolve 75e, and they are designed with the professional in mind.

With 14 hours of battery life, and only two hours to charge, active noise cancellation, and a busy light that lets your co-workers know that you shouldn’t be bothered during a call, these earbuds are optimal for the workplace environment.

With the Jabra Link 370- that little USB dongle showed in this picture, you can connect to your computer, and simultaneously be connected to Apple and Android smart devices. This means that you can listen to your music, and be ready to answer the next call that comes through as well.

You don’t need to hear the phone to answer calls. The neck piece will vibrate when a call comes through. When you want to take a break from wearing these in your ears, magnets near the earbuds keep them hanging around your neck tangle free. But you don’t have to take out your earbuds to hear the world around you. Simply holding down the ANC button, will allow noise to pass through, so you can be a part of the environment around you as well.

These professional wireless earbuds come at a professional price- at about $259.00. They are well worth the price, though, and a good investment for businesses. To find out more about this fantastic apparatus, including all the communication platforms these earbuds work with, head on over to the website here.

Jabra does not sponsor TheGeekChurch, but they did send us these earbuds to review for free in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.

Earin True Wireless Earbuds Review

Only_Buds_front-620x400With all the activity we do, it’s great to not to have to be tied down to something. Many earbuds have you hooked up to a line trailing down your arm, neck , back, or leg. There’s an option, though, for those who don’t want strings to hold them down. We were sent these wireless EARIN earbuds to review, so here we go.

Coming from a Swiss startup, these Bluetooth- enabled earbuds come in a nice package. The box that holds them looks like a cardboard box, but it opens and closes magnetically, and the magnets also attract the earbuds so that they don’t fly out when you open the box. We still recommend that you carefully open the box because there still is a chance for them to fly out, and those little guys are miniscule and round, and they roll.

The box contains the wireless earbuds, a charging capsule reminiscent of the flashy-thing in the Men in Black movie, a micro USB cable to charge the flashy-thing, stabilizers to make extra sure they won’t come out of your ears with heavy activity. There’s also the Comply foam tips that give a tight seal, or if you would rather, there are Silicone tips.

The case, or flashy-thing, will hold the earbuds as they charge, and you had better be sure to put these earbuds in the case when you aren’t using them, as that is the only way to turn them off. If you just put them in your pocket, the battery will drain on them, so it’s best to keep them in the case. It will likely be a safer place to keep them anyway. A simple light will turn on while it’s charging the earbuds, another light on top indicates that the case is charging itself.earin-true-wireless-earbuds-with-charging-case-and-aweni7-5

There are complaints that sometimes the right ear bud will cut out, and there is sometimes lag when watching videos. The left ear bud is the one that connects to your device, and the right one is a slave, so it’s not always as reliable as the left.

Other wireless earbuds on the market might run less expensive on price, but we haven’t been able to compare the sound quality of them. We have reviewed the Jabra¬†wireless earbuds, and they are about $100 more, though the Earins used to be the same price, and the Jabra had the addition of being able to take calls because of the microphone. You can’t take calls on the Earins. You can also check your heartrate with the Jabra pair.

Earin does have a special app that you use on your phone to control the bass boost, the balance of volume in each ear, and you can see how much battery life you have left in them. Speaking of battery life, there is about 3 hours of battery life in them, and you can charge them up to 3 times in a fully charged capsule.

Earin is coming out in the future with the M-2 earbuds. These look to be more advanced with a microphone and a way to control them with touch interface on the earbuds. The question will be whether they are comparable in price and quality to the other wireless earbuds out there. Still, at $149, the M-1 might be what you are looking for.

The Bragi Dash and Free Wavz Totally Wireless Earbuds

Bragi DashI’ve seen and reviewed a lot of wireless earbuds in the past, and the most “convenient” ones are like the Jabra Sport Wireless, which are two earbuds that are joined together by a singular wire. While I was at CES 2015, I saw two pairs of completely wireless earbuds that snip the wire and keep the sound.

I’ll start with the Dash, from a company known as Bragi. The Dash is a “Hearable” which I am assume is a combination of “hear” and “wearable”. So, as a wearable, it has body sensors that can actually track your performance as you are running in real-time. Stuff that can be tracked is pace, steps, cadence, distance, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and energy spent.

What is interesting is that you don’t have to be hooked to a phone in order to listen to music. That’s right, it has 4 GB inside that you can play 1000 songs with. Not bad. By the way, it can drown out almost any outside sound.

Now, if you want to pre-order it, you can for a price of $299.00, and it should be available in April right here.

Free WavzThe second product that are Totally Wireless Earbuds is the Free Wavz. These have 3-axis accelerometers and pulse oximeters that can monitor heart rate, calories burned, speed, distance, workout duration, and oxygen saturation.

As you can see, the Free Wavz has a different look than the Dash. They have internal Flash memory with 16MB, which isn’t as much as the Dash, but I am not certain if you can operate the Free Wavz without a phone.

I believe that the Free Wavz will be available sometime in March 2015 right here.